Tag Archives: GOLD

SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – TRADE, IMMIGRATION, MUELLER, YADA, YADA, DEFICITS EXPLODE

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – TRADE, IMMIGRATION, MUELLER, YADA, YADA, DEFICITS EXPLODE

There is lots of economic/political/social news day to day, but we believe the underlying fiscal/monetary problems will soon dwarf the currently discussed issues. In this country alone, billions of dollars per day (in deficit spending) are being created out of thin air.   It’s been said that “money is the source of all evil”. That may be true, but a currency of some sort is necessary to exchange goods and services to make social progress. Since we are in the midst of the largest monetary experiment in the history of the planet, and we don’t believe it will end well, unfortunately, we continue to monitor developments.

While there was quite a bit of intra-month volatility in the capital markets in November, the changes were minimal over the entire month. The precious metal markets were much quieter, but there was one notable down day, November 23rd, the reason not quite clear, with mining stocks down 3-4% which was not recovered by month end.  In any event, the gold mining industry, represented by GDXJ (the small to mid-cap miners) and the three prominent funds, Tocqueville, Oppenheimer and Van Eck were down about 2.7%.

Every indication is that the long-term financial issues overhanging the worldwide economy are becoming more intense every day, any one of which could ignite the monetary embers:

(1) The US Treasury must raise over $100B every week, to finance the growing deficit and refinance the maturing debt, and the Federal Reserve is no longer a buyer but a seller of securities. The “bid to cover” ratio for two-year US Treasuries has been coming down in recent months, and last month was the lowest since December 2008, the peak of the financial crisis.

(2) Major foreign purchasers of our debt, including China, Japan & Russia have backed off or eliminated entirely their purchases of US Treasury securities, to some extent replacing that portion of their foreign reserves with gold. As a corollary, the US trade balance that President Trump is so desperate to improve, would reduce the US dollars in foreign hands, which would in turn reduce the demand for our debt, contribute to higher interest rates, slow our economy, and trigger greater stimulus.

(3) Only six to nine months ago, reporters were talking about “worldwide synchronized growth” with no sign of inflation, truly a “goldilocks” situation. Just two weeks ago, headlines in the Wall Street Journal said “GLOBAL ECONOMIC SLOWDOWN DEEPENS”, “INFLATION TICKS HIGHER…”, “INTERNATIONAL FIRMS IN US SEE AUTO TARIFFS AS A THREAT”. As a corollary, Japan and Germany reported GDP contraction in Q3, Chinese growth continues to slow. So much for Goldilocks.

(4) The US current deficit, is exploding, will clearly be over $1 trillion in FY ending 9/30/19, with the total debt going up by more like $1.5T including borrowing from the Social Security Fund. There is no chance of less government spending, especially the next two years with the two houses of Congress split. According to the Wall Street Journal, the US will spend more on interest in 2020 than it spends on Medicaid, more in 2023 than it spends on national defense, and more in 2025 than it spends on all non defense discretionary programs combined. THIS IS SERIOUS, AND IT IS IMMINENT. The relevance of the deficits and debt is that the higher the debt load, the chance of the economy breaking out with productive expansion is reduced.

(5) The long-term suppression of interest rates has serious unintended consequences. Among them is the “misallocation of resources” as investors large and small “reach for yield”.  The current news flow is starting to reflect it. The Wall Street Journal two weeks ago had the headline DEMAND FOR RISKIER DEBT LETS COMPANIES SHIFT ASSETS.  The text ….” Investors are literally giving away the store to squeeze out meager returns from picked over market for corporate debt. Demand for riskier bonds and loans has been so intense that companies…are able to move valuable assets beyond the reach of creditors. Investors continue to make it easier for them to do so by agreeing to terms …that offer fewer and fewer protections.” The financial community has a very short memory. Ten years ago, the phrase was “covenant light”, and mortgage companies were making NINJA loans to homeowners with No Income No Job, and No Assets. Who said, “history doesn’t repeat, but it rhymes”? Just this morning, this was described in the Wall Street Journal in relation to sub-prime Auto Loans.

(6) Don’t take it from me. I’m just a veteran restaurant analyst. What could I know? However, within the last few months: Richard Fisher, former Dallas Fed Chair said: “…interest expense and healthcare expenditures will soon be more than 50% of revenues. At some point you have to pay the piper…We (the Fed) have been suppressing the yield curve. it’s a ticking time bomb”.

Ludwig von Mises, the legendary Austrian economist long ago taught us: “There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom brought about by credit expansion. The alternative is only whether the crisis should come soon as the result of voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved.”

(7) Just last week Goldman Sachs came around (finally) to the view that markets offer an extremely attractive entry point for longs in goldWe see diversification value in adding gold to portfolios.” Goldman is (finally) forecasting a slowing US economy….at this stage of the business cycle, gold may be particularly appealing as a portfolio diversifier given that long-term bonds may be hurt if U.S inflation surprises to the upside … If U.S. growth slows down next year, as expected, gold would benefit from higher demand for defensive assets.”

Unfortunately, though Jay Powell, and other Central Bankers, might wish to persist in their collective attempt to contract credit, the politicians around the world can be expected to continue to kick the can down the road. Their unstated reality is “whatever happens will happen, but “not on my watch.” Politicians, economists, and capital market strategists, will soon be screaming “DO SOMETHING” and the Central Bankers will accommodate. Jay Powell gave us the first indication of that with his comments last week. Steven Mnuchin, Treasury Secretary, confirmed that just this morning, saying Powell is trying to position the Fed to stimulate when necessary.

Roger Lipton

 

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BITCOIN DOWN 75% FROM ITS HIGH – WHAT TO DO NOW?

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We don’t get them all right, but we’ve been consistently negative on the prospects for Bitcoin, ever since we started writing about it in August of 2017. Bitcoin was trading then almost exactly where it is at the moment, about $4,600. Among our articles was one written at $16,964 on 12/19.17, one day after the all time high of $18,674. We have provided, for your easy review, our writings that have included reference to Bitcoin, the most recent listed first. A summation of our opinion today, is exactly as we expressed it with our first mention back in August of 2017. “When the books are written about the financial follies of the early 21st century, the rise of bitcoin will be one of the ringing bells signaling the end”.  There was 100% risk in owning Bitcoin at $18,674 and there remains 100% risk at $4,500.

August 16, 2018

SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – BITCOIN DOWN, GOLD ALSO – BUY ONE, AVOID OTHER BITCOIN – FLIRTING WITH A NEW LOW, A CORRECTION IN A LONG TERM BULL MARKET, OR AN END TO ITS RUN?

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2018/08/semi-monthly-fiscal-monetary-update-bitcoin-down-gold-also-buy-one-avoid-the-other/

February 1, 2018

FISCAL-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – GOLD FIRMS, US DOLLAR WILL REMAIN WEAK, BYE BYE BITCOIN (BLOCKCHAIN ADVOCATES WILL GO WITH THE GOLD) 

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2018/02/semi-monthly-fiscal-monetary-update-gold-firms-us-dollar-will-remain-weak-bye-bye-bitcoin/

January 17, 2018

SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – SOMETIMES A SIMPLE VIEW WORKS BEST, + BITCOIN UPDATE

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2018/01/semi-monthly-fiscal-monetary-update-sometimes-simple-view-works-best-bitcoin-update/

December 19, 2017

BITCOIN REVISITED: THE FLAW IS REALLY SIMPLE !!

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2017/12/semi-monthly-fiscal-monetary-update-bitcoin-revisited-flaw-really-simple/

September 5, 2017

SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – GOLD VS. BITCOIN – ONE WILL BE UP, THE OTHER DOWN !!

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2017/09/semi-monthly-fiscalmonetary-update-gold-vs-bitcoin-one-will/

August 15, 2017

BITCOIN MUST BE THE “NEXT BIG THING”, RIGHT?

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2017/08/bitcoin-must-next-big-thing-right/

August 1, 2017

SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – GOLD SLOWLY RISES – BITCOIN “ADJUSTMENTS” – BE CAREFUL OUT THERE!

https://www.liptonfinancialservices.com/2017/08/semi-monthly-fiscalmonetary-update-gold-slowly-rises-central-banks-buying-equities-sell/

 

 

 

 

 

 

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – CAPITAL MARKETS GYRATE – THE RUBBER MEETS THE ROAD!!

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – CAPITAL MARKETS GYRATE – THE RUBBER MEETS THE ROAD!!

Most of the trends we describe in this semi-monthly (or bi-weekly) column are very long term in nature. Day to day capital market trends are driven by short term trading techniques, often driven these days by computers that are making decisions based on price patterns, with no regard for the underlying fundamentals. I believe that the fundamentals drive the price patterns over the long term, not the reverse, and make my financial bets accordingly, in restaurant industry investments as well as broader decisions with my total capital. Lots of market commentators, including the infamous Jim Cramer who is a brilliant short term trader, fit their daily commentary to the daily price action, because there must be a reason that the market was strong or weak today. Trying to “game” the markets day to day is not the way to make money and keep it over the long term, and keeping it can be even tougher than making it, because there are lots of ways to lose.

We believe that a lot of the long term problems that have been overhanging the capital markets for decades are becoming very intense, and are likely to explode in the fairly short term, like a simmering ember prepare to ignite. The deficits, the debit, the spending, the money creation by Central Banks, the suppression of interest rates, the challenging worldwide economy, the wealth gap, the political dysfunction, the social unrest, and I could go on.

The current day to day news flow demonstrates the increasing intensity of the problems.

(1) The US Treasury must raise over $100B every week, to finance the annual deficit and refinance the maturing debt, and the Federal Reserve is no longer a buyer but a seller of securities. Last month’s “bid to cover” ratio for two year US Treasuries has been coming down in recent months, last month was the lowest since December 2008. You might remember that this was the peak of the financial crisis of ’08-’09.

(2) Major foreign purchasers of our debt, including China, Japan & Russia have backed off or eliminated entirely their purchases of US Treasury securities, to some extent replacing that portion of their foreign reserves with gold. As a corollary, the US trade balance that President Trump is so desperate to improve, would reduce the US dollars in foreign hands, in turn reducing the demand for our securities, contributing to higher interest rates here which slows our economy.

(3) Readers of this column know that we have been skeptical of the apparent strength in our economy, though only six to nine months ago, reporters were talking about “worldwide synchronized growth” with no sign of inflation, truly a “goldilocks” situation. Headlines in today’s Wall Street Journal say “GLOBAL ECONOMIC SLOWDOWN DEEPENS”, “INFLATION TICKS HIGHER…”, “INTERNATIONAL FIRMS IN US SEE AUTO TARIFFS AS A THREAT”. Japan and Germany reported GDP contraction in Q3, Chinese growth continues to slow. So much for Goldilocks.

(4) Jay Powell, our Fed Chairman, has a serious problem. He is committed to raise rates further, and continue to sell off assets (which are only down about 7% from the peak 14 months ago), but higher rates will further stall our economy. His other choice is to back off, even do QE4 in some form, ignite inflation (and a run on gold), but that has its own risk of economic disruption. We may already be in an  unrecognized “stagflation”.

(4) The US current deficit will clearly be over $1 trillion in FY ending 9/30/19, with the total debt going up by more like $1.5T including borrowing from the Social Security Fund. There is no chance of less government spending, especially the next two years with  the two houses of Congress split. According to the Wall Street Journal last week, the US will spend more on interest in 2020 than it spends on Medicaid, more in 2023 than  it spends on national defense, and more in 2025 than it spends on all nondefense discretionary programs combined. THIS IS SERIOUS, AND IT IS IMMINENT. The relevance of the deficits and debt is that the higher the debt load, the chance of the economy breaking out with productive expansion is reduced.

(5) The long term suppression of interest rates has serious unintended consequences. Among them is the “misallocation of resources” as investors large and small “reach for yield”.  The current news flow is starting to reflect it. Today’s Wall Street Journal has the headline DEMAND FOR RISKIER DEBT LETS COMPANIES SHIFT ASSETS.  The text starts….”Investors are literally giving away the store to squeeze out meager returns from picked over market for corporate debt. Demand for riskier bonds and loans has been so intense that companies…are able to move valuable assets beyond the reach of creditors. Investors continue to make it easier for them to do so by agreeing to terms …that offer fewer and fewer protections.” The financial community has a very short memory. Ten years ago, the phrase was “covenant light”, and mortgage companies were making NINJA loans to homeowners with No Income No Job, and No Assets. Who said, “history doesn’t repeat, but it rhymes”?

(5) Don’t take it from me. I’m  just a veteran restaurant analyst. What could I know? However, within the last few months: Richard Fisher, former Dallas Fed Chair said: “…interest expense and healthcare expenditures will soon be more than 50% of revenues. At some point you have to pay the piper…We (the Fed) have been suppressing the yield curve..if rates rise, it’s a ticking time bomb”.

Ludwig von Mises, the legendary Austrian economist long ago provided a succinct summary: “There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom brought about by credit expansion. The alternative is only whether the crisis should come soon as the result of voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved.”

Unfortunately, though Jay Powell, and other Central Bankers,  might wish to persist in (just the beginning) of their collective attempt to contract credit, the politicians around the world can be expected to continue to kick the can down the road. Their unstated reality is “whatever happens will happen, but “not on my watch.” Politicians, economists, and capital market strategists, will soon be screaming “DO SOMETHING” and the Central Bankers will accomodate. The best we can do is to stay physically fit and financially flexible.

Roger Lipton

 

 

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – RISING DEFICITS, EVEN FASTER RISING DEBT – “WE’VE ONLY JUST BEGUN”

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – RISING DEFICITS, EVEN FASTER RISING DEBT – “WE’VE ONLY JUST BEGUN

September was basically flat in the equity markets, the Dow and S&P up slightly, the Russell and NASDAQ Composite indexes down a bit. Gold bullion and the gold miners were very, very quiet. Gold bullion was down 0.6%. The large and small gold mining ETFs, GDX and GDXJ, were down 0.2% and 1.1% respectively. The three gold mining mutual funds that we track, TGLDX, OPGSX and INIVX were up an average of .015%. The adjustment of the Vanguard Precious Metals Fund, which we discussed last month, has apparently run its course by the end of September, with them selling something like $1.5 billion of mining stocks. The last time they did this, in 2000, it was just prior to a twelve-year bull market, during which gold bullion went up six times in value and the mining stocks by a multiple of that.

We discussed last month how the price of gold has generally followed the increase in US debt, which itself is a precursor of an increase in inflation, the only politically acceptable way of dealing with that debt. In August, 1971, Richard Nixon closed the “gold window” because the prospect of rising deficits were creating “a run” on the US gold reserve. The price of gold went from $35 to a high of $850 per oz. in the 1970s. The gold price went from $250 to just under $1000 per oz. between 2000 and 2009 with the rising deficits created by the aftermath of 9/11 and the cost of two wars. The move from the 900s to a high of 1850 between 2009 and 2011 took place as the deficits rose sharply in the early years of the Obama administration. The decline since 2011 has coincided with less concern, misguided as shown below, over rising deficits. We want to “close the loop” with specific facts about deficits and debt over the last eleven years. In summation, the annual “deficit” has come down materially less than advertised, is now going up materially more than presented, and the result of annual deficits, namely the cumulative debt burden is a larger problem than ever before.

The following table shows, over the last eleven years, the stated annual deficit, as well as the year end debt. The increase in debt has far exceeded the reported deficit. Over eleven years, the difference is a monstrous $3.24 Trillion. It is interesting that in fiscal 2014 and 2016, two of the four years (from ’13 to ’16) when the annual deficit was so widely advertised as being “reduced”, the debt somehow went up by an “extra” $1.39 trillion, from what we call “non-budgeted” spending.

As the following table shows, the stated deficit for the fiscal year ending 9/30/18 will be something like $830 billion. The increase in the debt, however has been $1.29 trillion, with an extra $460 billon “needed”. It is interesting that the 9/30/19 Congressional Budget Office estimates when presented in Feb’17 called for a deficit of $526 billion. By Feb’18, the 9/30/19 estimate had been increased to $984 billion. Just yesterday, the official CBO estimate is now $1.085 trillion for the next twelve months, ending 9/30/19. Based on (1) the historical pattern (2) the obvious spending needs for defense, higher interest rates, health care and other entitlements, storm remediation, etc. (3) the current administration’s conviction that you have to “spend money to make money” and lack of fear of debt: we will “bet on the over” in terms of the cumulative debt growing materially more than $1.085 trillion deficit forecast. The CBO estimates, by the way, call for increasingly large numbers beyond fiscal ’19.

There is, lately, a bit more concern by the politicians, economists, and pundits about the reported and projected deficits and cumulative debt. However, because the inflation, as presented by government statistics, has been modest, the general assumption is that it can be “controlled”, and as, Dick Cheney suggested, the “deficits don’t matter”. Others (such as Stanley Drukenmiller, Ray Dalio and Howard Marx)  have said something like  “ignore history at your own peril”, and we are in that camp. In terms of the deficits: as the song goes “We’ve only just begun”.  We believe there will soon be a major price to be paid for the financial promiscuity of politicians and central bankers in recent decades, especially during the last ten years.  Governments can’t print their way out the problem. One doesn’t get out of a hole by continuing to dig.

We continue to believe that, as the distortions within the worldwide financial system become more apparent,  the gold price will catch up with the inflation of most other asset classes, and the gold mining stocks will move by a multiple of the gold price.

Roger Lipton

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – THE DEFICITS AND DEBT – HERE WE GO AGAIN!

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE

The general capital markets were up modestly in July, gold bullion was down 2.3%. The gold mining stocks were down about 3.5%.  Most importantly, our conviction hasn’t changed regarding the long term outlook for our portfolio that is heavily invested in gold mining stocks.

While last month we outlined a group of tangible factors that support our thesis, it could be useful to go back to the biggest single reason that gold will be the surviving “currency”, protecting purchasing power best. The worldwide credit pyramid that has fueled the economic growth over the last forty years must be liquidated. Debts must be paid off, and the numbers are too large for the worldwide economy to grow out of the problem. “Default” will be the result, but refusal to pay is too obvious and makes the politicians look bad. Inflation is the only other solution since the voting public doesn’t understand who caused it. Gold has gone from $250/oz. to $1200/oz. since 2000, starting with the President GW Bush debts to finance the aftermath of 9/11 and then the two wars. Gold doubled from $900 in ’09 and the gold mining stocks quadrupled and more) as the deficit spending ramped up even further under President Obama.

Here we go again: The projected US deficit in the fiscal year ending 9/30/18 is projected to be about $800B, up from $600B last year. However, the cumulative debt in the 10 months ending today ($21.2 trillion) is already one trillion dollars higher than last September and is projected to be higher by $1.2 trillion by 9/30.

Only in governmental accounting can the annual deficits not total the cumulative increase in debt. This is not new. You have no doubt heard from politicians and economists who are concerned about the future deficit spending. Republicans are concerned when Democrats are in power, and now the situation is reversed. However, they don’t talk about the excess debt, on top of the budgeted spending, called other borrowing. Over the last ten years, the cumulative debt increase has exceeded the total of annual deficits by a cool three trillion dollars. People, this is a lot of money. While the annual deficits going forward are projected to be over a trillion dollars annually over the next decade, you can only imagine what the cumulative debt will look like after the other borrowing. We have described the situation in terms of US debts, but enormous potential credit problems also overhang the economies of China, Japan, and the Eurozone, the largest after the USA. What the endgame looks like is unknown, but it won’t be pretty.

Stay healthy. Stay financially flexible.

Roger Lipton

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – YOU DON’T WANT TO KNOW HOW THE SAUSAGE IS MADE !!

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – You Don’t Want to Know How the Sausage is Made !!

The general capital markets were fairly unchanged in June, gold bullion was down 3.4%. Interestingly, the gold mining stocks were down hardly at all. The gold mining ETFs, GDX and GDXJ, were almost exactly flat. The three major gold mining mutual funds were down an average of 0.8%.  Every indication is that substantial quantities of physical gold continues to move from West to East but the “paper” market, including options and futures, dominates the day to day price. The mining stocks acted noticeably better, when normally they could be down (or up) at least twice the price of gold. There was documented accumulation of GDX and GDXJ which is often a precursor of an upward move in bullion and an even larger move in the miners.

THERE IS NO SHORTAGE OF MACRO DEVELOPMENTS WITH LONG TERM IMPLICATIONS !!

In just the last few days, the following articles support our long held conclusions that a great deal of turmoil in the worldwide financial/capital markets is ahead, which we believe will cause our Fed and other Central Banks to “cave” and move back to monetary accommodation, which will spark a new run in gold related securities:

(1)    First Quarter GDP latest revision shows 2.0% real growth, down from the last estimate of 2.3% and the previous estimates in the high 2s. As for Q2’18, the latest NY Fed estimate is 2.7%, a lot lower than the highly touted 4% or more the Atlanta Fed and others have been talking about.  Even if Q2 comes in north of 4%, real GDP growth over the last year or so has been no higher that the “high 2s”, not much higher than the average of 2.3% average of the last 8-9 years and that modest increase from the “low 2s” is largely due to more government spending financed by more government debt and this is not healthy or sustainable over the longer term.

(2)  The global yield curve, the spread between 1-3 year and 7-10 year government securities, has just gone “negative”, per the JP Morgan GBI index. This yield curve “inversion” most of the time presages a recession within 6-12 months.

(3)    With the Chinese stock market down 20% from its early ’18 high, a Chinese government think tank (backed by the Chinese Academy of Social Science) has warned of a “financial panic” in the world’s second largest economy, caused by leveraged purchase of shares (as in 2015), rising US interest rates, trade tensions with the US, bond defaults and liquidity shortages in China. The Chinese government should “be willing to step in with full financial support, rather than taking piecemeal steps” the study said. Just yesterday, the Financial Times reported that the China Development Bank was tightening loan approvals for its “slum development” policy, a program which has provided (a cool) $1 trillion to homebuyers since (only) 2016. The implications of the monetary manipulations by the world’s second biggest economy are huuuge!. Our take: a much higher gold price will accompany future economic “adjustments” that will have been exacerbated by governmental interventions.

(4)    Russia has cut its US Treasury holdings over 50%, from $102.2B to $48.7B in just four months from 12/17 to 4/18. While these numbers are small relative to the trillions that China and Japan hold, US Treasury securities held by all foreigners, as a percent of their reserves, has declined from 64.59% in 2014 to 62.7% in 2017, so they are steadily diversifying away from dollar related securities. Gold, as a share of foreign exchange reserves has held steady. Central Banks have continued buying hundreds of tons annually, as they have since 2009. They bought 116.5 tons in Q1’18, the most in any Q1 since 2014 and up 42% YTY.

(5)    The Wall Street Journal, several days ago, headlined “UK Central Bank Warns on Debt Risk”. The article said “it sees pockets of risk to the stability of the financial system including US corporate borrowing, risky loans in Britain, foreign-currency lending and emerging markets….as central banks step back from the easy-money policies of the past decade and trade tensions escalate.” You can google the full article, but we don’t make this stuff up.

(6)    Just under the previous article, on June 28th, the headline read: “Fed’s Ability to Fine-Tune Interest Rates is Tested”. The Fed lost “control” of the markets in ’08, salvaged the situation with trillions of financial accommodation. In some ways, the problems are larger today and the Fed, with their hundreds of PHD economists, has had a poor forecasting record.

(7)    While many observers underplay “systemic” risks in today’s financial markets, leverage in derivative securities is larger, non-financial corporate debt is at a new high (exceeding the last high in ’08), ETFs made up of cap-weighted securities will have little liquidity in a downdraft, which especially could apply to high yield fixed income ETFs. Rising default rates on student loans and subprime auto loans, sharply rising US deficits, underfunded social security and federal health care obligations are all problematic whether the market overlooks these trends for the moment or not. The momentum in capital markets can turn, literally, on a dime. If someone doesn’t think the Chinese monetary manipulation has provided at least the possibility of “systemic risk” to the worldwide economy, they are living on the wrong planet.

(8)    The equity markets are highly valued by historical standards. Interest rates are still very low which means bond prices also have substantial downside risk, especially the high yield sector where investors around the world have been “reaching for yield” for a decade.

Conclusion:

Many of the above factors have been in play over the last four or five years, building over decades, and the timing of the unwinding of the worldwide credit bubble continues to be uncertain. It’s been said that in every crisis, you can look like a fool either before the event or after. Another advisor, when asked how a crisis develops, said “very slowly and then very quickly”. Just recently, we asked a highly regarded economist and market strategist, who agrees with us, when the turn will come. His response was as good as any: “On any given Sunday”. When it happens, a great number of people will say “how could I have not seen that?”

Roger Lipton

 

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – GOLD LOWER LAST FRIDAY – “MANIPULATION”???

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – GOLD LOWER LAST FRIDAY, “MANIPULATION” ???

Not much has changed fundamentally in the last couple of weeks. The economy is doing somewhat better, aided materially by increased government spending. Capex investment by corporations is still lagging, housing and auto activity are slowing as interest rates rise, the deficit moves predictably higher as health care costs, higher interest rates on the US debt, and much higher defense spending are long term facts of life. Though consumer sentiment and business optimism is much improved over the last year or so, consumers are still stretched financially and the possibility of a tariff “war” continues to unsettle capital markets and the business community.

Gold and gold miners have been quietly consolidating over the last few months, but had an uncharacteristically volatile day, on the downside last Friday.  That just happened to be an option expiration day, which often can generate unusually large price changes.  This type of volatility, heavy trading volume, especially at illiquid times of the day (“middle of the night”), and at inflection points for the technical chartists, used to be fairly frequent occurrences, in the gold markets in particular. It seemed like every time there was especially bullish news for gold, the price would get hit, with heavy volume in futures and options at times of the day when nobody “in their right mind” would be trying to liquidate a “real” physical position unless they were consciously trying to manipulate the short term price of “paper” gold. In any market where there are futures and options trading, aggressive traders of the “paper” who don’t have to immediately deliver the physical “underlying”, can trigger “stop loss” orders at certain predictable prices. Over time, these distortions get corrected, but the short term volatility can be unsettling. Longer term physical buyers use these distortions as buying opportunities, and it is no coincidence that China, India, Russia, and others have continued to be major buyers of physical gold, demonstrating their diversification of assets away from US Treasury issued securities. China and Russia, in particular, have clear reasons to undermine confidence in the US Dollar, improving trade and investment in the Yuan and Ruble, and a higher gold price would do just that. They understand the nature of the worldwide currency debasement and are doing what they can to cope, though our politicians lack the political will to do the same.

Friday, the fifteenth of June, was an option expiration day which, in and of itself, can increase price volatility. It cannot be coincidental that, after India and China had closed their physical trading markets, large quantities of gold futures contracts were dumped into the CME’s Globex computer trading system just before the Comex gold pit opened for the day (at 8:20 a.m. EST).  The chart below shows the price action, and note especially how the trading volume exploded higher from the typically much lower levels. IN ONE HOUR, from 8-9am EST, futures contracts representing 9.03 million oz. of gold traded, which is slightly more than the 9.01 million oz. of TOTAL GOLD STOCK in the Comex vaults, and 17.7x the number of gold oz. “available to deliver”. For the entire day, 49.5 million oz. worth of “paper” traded, the equivalent of about six months of entire worldwide production.

It does not seem farfetched to conclude that nobody in their right mind would choose this particular time of day and month to “dump” such a large quantity of “real” gold, unless the seller wanted the price lower. This has happened before, and an artificially low short term price gave way to much higher prices in the near future. No individual seller is larger than the worldwide market, over a reasonable period of time. A buyer at an artificially high price had better be prepared to buy “it all”, because they will own it. A seller, at a price lower than the true market would allow, had better have an enormous inventory because the buyers will keep coming. It will be interesting to see how this latest incident of seemingly irrational volatility gets resolved.

Roger Lipton

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – ECONOMIC STRENGTH “OVERSTATED”, CAPITAL MARKETS QUIET, PRECIOUS METALS “CONSOLIDATE”

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARYUPDATE – ECONOMY “OVERSTATED”, CAPITAL MARKETS FIRM FURTHER, PRECIOUS METALS “CONSOLIDATE”

June  4, 2018

The equity market firmed in May and the fixed income market strengthened late in the month, after sinking mid-month, ending modestly higher (yields lower) than at May 1. Precious metals related holdings were quiet overall. The gold miners did slightly better than gold bullion which was down 1.2%.  We can’t help but repeat last month’s statement, that we continue to feel that the gold mining stocks, which represent almost all of our portfolio, represent the best value (and most unloved) asset class of all. The “money” is being safely stored, in the ground.  It is just a question of when it will be brought north and exchanged for the “colored paper” of its time, and the quantity of green paper (in the US) will be a multiple of the current $1300 per oz. The dramatic increase in profits for the gold miners will put their stocks an order of magnitude higher than they are currently.

The thoughts that currently come to mind are as follows:

  • The economy, while firming, is not at the 3-4% GDP growth that the administration advertises. After several quarters last year that averaged about 3.0% of real GDP growth, Q1’18 finally came in at a modest 2.2%. It will obviously take GDP growth of well over 3% (far from certain) for the rest of the year to reach the 3% annual objective. The higher interest rates will hinder consumer spending as well as limit the government’s ability to stimulate. Also, an inhibition, the tariff/ trade negotiations continue to keep the business community and capital markets on edge.
  • The Fed is barely keeping up with the plan to shrink their $4.2 trillion balance sheet. While they are stretching to reduce by the current rate of 2.8% (big deal!) annually, interest rates are steadily moving higher which drags on the economy and insures that the current selling program won’t make much of a dent before the program gets abandoned, and it won’t be long.
  • Inflation (which is a good reason for owning gold) is not as dormant as commentators indicate. “Core Inflation”, the most commonly quoted indicator, excludes food and energy. You know what grocery and restaurant prices (heavily influenced by higher labor costs) are doing, and the recent gasoline price rise is absorbing a lot of the recent tax cut.
  • The US deficit in the year ending 9/30/18 is officially estimated at $825B, but I’ll take “the over”. Certainly at least $1 Trillion is in the cards for 9/30/19 with higher defense spending, higher interest costs, and lower taxes on an economy that remains sluggish.

We believe that, due to any number of possible catalysts, the Fed will back off. The inevitable new round of stimulus should finally spark gold related securities much higher. It’s just a question of time.

Roger Lipton

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – THE ECONOMY, FED’S BALANCE SHEET, INTEREST RATES, GOLD

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY REPORT – THE ECONOMY, FED BALANCE SHEET, INTEREST RATES, GOLD

A PROGRESS REPORT: IN SUMMARY

THE ECONOMY

Meet the new economy, very similar to the old economy. While the Trump administration touts the 3% (and moving higher) economy and history making low unemployment rate, real GDP growth came in at 2.3% in Q1, down from the 3.2% peak of Q3’17 and 2.9% in Q4’17. Both of the H2’17 reports were inflated by storm remediation expenses. Keep in mind that government spending, now at a record level, contributes to GDP, so the “organic” economic growth is very similar (within a couple of tenths) to the 2.3% average under the Obama administration, even in spite of deficit spending that is ramping higher. The 3.9% low unemployment rate is a function of a participation rate moving lower, not materially more employment. There is no question that things are a lot better than nine years ago when 600,000 workers were let go each month and there are more companies looking for workers as the necessary skills are often not present. Balancing the picture: while the tax cut has now kicked in, so have higher gasoline prices, and the consumer savings rate is moving higher once again after coming down late last year. Our readers know that we look at restaurant sales as a predictable leading indicator of the general economy. Today’s Miller Pulse headline tells us that April sales were “the highest since 2016”.  Unfortunately, the 1.6% sales gain in April was overcome by negative traffic of 0.7%, the 26th straight month of traffic decline. Two year same store sales rose 1.2% in April, vs. 1.1% in March and a 1.8% decline (the storms no doubt) in February.  If we consider that prices are rising by a couple of percent per year, traffic is running down 3 or 4% over two years. “Down so far, down looks like up to me” is the country western song writer’s way to put it.

THE FED’S BALANCE SHEET AND INTEREST RATES

We all know that the Fed is normalizing it’s balance sheet, by $10B/month in Q4’17, then $20B/month in Q1’18, now at $30B/month in Q2, going to be $40B/month in Q3 and $50B/month in Q4. These reductions are supposed to be “automatic” as treasury securities and other holdings mature and the balance of the planned decrease is liquidated. We have discussed before how interest rates have steadily moved upward, beginning exactly last October when the normalization started. The planned reduction got behind almost immediately in Q4’17, kept pace through in Q1’18 and April’18, though not making up the shortfall of Q4 and has gotten further behind in early May. Our analysis shows that the cumulative shortfall is about $30B at this point, and of course that can change week to week. It may be no coincidence that interest rates are back to their high this morning, with the ten year at $3.05%, as the Fed tries to reduce by $15B or more this week to catch up. The bottom line is that the Fed’s balance sheet normalization is more than likely to drive interest rates still higher, at least that’s the way it looks so far. This interest rate rise in turn affects housing (see Home Depot stock this morning), auto sales, consumer interest expense, and contributes to a stronger dollar which undermines the general economy further.

GOLD and GOLD MINING STOCKS

The stock market has been up eight days in a row (until today), interest rates (and the dollar) have been firming slowly (more than “firm” this morning) so there continues to be no urgency to look to gold as a “safe haven”. We have pointed out in the past that neither higher interest rates nor a strong dollar are a death knell over time for gold related securities but in the short run a weak dollar and lower interest rates are better. Considering the recent strength in the dollar and the steady march of interest rates higher this year, the fact that gold bullion is virtually unchanged for the year and the mining stocks are down only modestly is not terrible performance. The gold mining companies, which is our primary way to participate in this out of favor asset class, are holding the “real money” in the ground for safekeeping. It’s just a question of time until they bring it north and exchange it for the “colored paper of the day”, at much higher dollars per ounce than today.

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – MODEST APPARENT CHANGES IN APRIL, HUUUGE DEVELOPMENTS UNDER THE SURFACE

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SEMI-MONTHLY FISCAL/MONETARY UPDATE – Modest apparent changes in April, huge developments under the surface!

 

The results for all the capital markets changed only modestly in the month April, in spite of intra-month volatility. Gold bullion was down almost exactly 1%, Gold mining stocks were up about 1.2%. We continue to feel that the gold mining stocks, represent the best value (and most unloved) asset class of all. The “money” is being safely stored, in the ground.  It is just a question of when it will be brought north and exchanged for the “colored paper” of its time, and the quantity of green paper (in the US) will be a multiple of the current $1300 per oz. The increase in profits for the gold miners will be huuuge and the stocks should sell for multiples of the current price.

We believe that the lackluster price action in gold and the miners has been due to the expectation of much higher interest rates, an apparently stronger economy, the perceived lack of a need for gold as a “safe haven”, and the renewed strength in the US Dollar. We don’t believe any of these factors will last much longer, and none of which will preclude higher prices in the long run.

The US economy is not as strong as advertised. After several quarters last year that averaged about 3.0% of real GDP growth, Q1’18 came in at a modest 2.3%. It is important to note that government spending of $4.5 trillion is part of our $20 trillion GDP economy. When government spending of $150 – $200 billion (over perhaps H2’17) to repair storm damage, that adds 1.5 to 2.5 points to GDP growth. That means that something like half (or more) of the “growth” in the last six months (as a % of $10T of six months’ GDP) was due to storm remediation. (That’s correct, I checked the math three times.) As another example, an increase of $100 billion in defense spending, over a year, will add 0.5% to our annual GDP. So, the bigger the deficit (in turn increasing interest expense), the better the GDP appears. The apparently stronger GDP growth in H2’17 was also positively affected by the weaker dollar and this, too, has changed lately, probably contributing to the tepid 2.3% Q1’18 GDP real growth.

Interest rates have moved up steadily, as the Fed has simultaneously raised the short term Fed Funds rate and sold increasing amounts of its bloated $4.3 trillion balance sheet. The much higher interest expense, combined with government spending will explode the deficit, which in turn will burden the economy even further. The Fed will back off. We will have new round of stimulus, much bigger than the “financial heroin” hit of ’08-’09. That should finally spark gold related securities much higher. It’s just a question of time.

Roger Lipton

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